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Criteria & Learning Outcomes – Level 3

TLM Level 3 Qualifications in Designing, Engineering and Constructing a Sustainable Built Environment (QCF)

Assessor's Guide to interpreting the Level 3 criteria

General Information

QCF general description for Level 3 qualifications

  • Achievement at Level 3 (EQF Level 4) reflects the ability to identify and use relevant understanding, methods and skills to complete tasks and address problems that, while well defined, have a measure of complexity. It includes taking responsibility for initiating and completing tasks and procedures as well as exercising autonomy and judgment within limited parameters. It also reflects awareness of different perspectives or approaches within an area of study or work.
  • Use factual, procedural and theoretical understanding to complete tasks and address problems that, while well defined, may be complex and non-routine.
  • Identify, select and use appropriate skills, methods and procedures.
  • Use appropriate investigation to inform actions.
  • Review how effective methods and actions have been.
  • Take responsibility for initiating and completing tasks and procedures, including, where relevant, responsibility for supervising or guiding others.
  • Exercise autonomy and judgement within limited parameters information and ideas.

Requirements

  • Standards must be confirmed by a trained Level 3 Assessor or higher.
  • Assessors must at a minimum record assessment judgements as entries in the online mark book on the INGOTs.org certification site.
  • Routine evidence of work used for judging assessment outcomes in the candidates’ records of their day to day work will be available from their e-portfolios and online work. Assessors should ensure that relevant web pages are available to their Account Manager on request by supply of the URL.
  • When the candidate provides evidence of matching all the criteria to the specification, subject to the guidance below, the assessor can request the award using the link on the certification site. The Account Manager will request a random sample of evidence from candidates’ work that verifies the assessor’s judgement.
  • When the Account Manager is satisfied that the evidence is sufficient to safely make an award, the candidate’s success will be confirmed and the unit certificate will be printable from the web site.
  • Each unit at Level 3 has recommended guided learning hours based on time required to complete by an average learner.

Assessment Method

Assessors can score each of the criteria N, L, S or H. N indicates no evidence and it is the default setting. L indicates some capability but some help still required to meet the standard. S indicates that the candidate can match the criterion to its required specification in keeping with the overall level descriptor. H indicates performance that goes beyond the expected in at least some aspects. Candidates are required to achieve at least S on all the criteria to achieve the full unit award. Once the candidate has satisfied all the criteria by demonstrating practical competence in realistic contexts they achieve the unit certificate.

UNIT 1: Defining a Sustainable Construction Project – 12 credits (60 GLH)

1. The candidate will research and convey the project remit.

I can:

1.1 identify a significant construction project for in-depth study

Candidates will identify sources which will provide the basis for a construction project.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will select an appropriate project either through an existing genuine architectural competition, or by identifying a building which they believe is needed in their own town.

1.2 communicate the vision for the project

Candidates will write a vision statement for their project and communicate it to relevant third parties.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should articulate their high level, aspirational ambitions for their project; what it will achieve when it is completed in the context of the people who will use it, the environment in which it sits and the sustainable objectives it will realise.

1.3 set the scene for the project in the context of the existing environment.

Candidates will provide a descriptive study of the local area where their project will be constructed.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should discuss the existing built environment and infrastructure, describe the current social, economic and environment situation and the general aesthetics and ‘feel’ of the area, what it means to the people who live and work, and indeed what it means to them personally. Candidates can provide a range of evidence to support their findings by devising appropriate questionnaires for on street surveys and interviewing diverse groups of the immediate local community e.g. local businesses, shoppers, the elderly, young people and students etc. They can find information through, for example, local authority, civic society, chamber of commerce and the office of national statistics’ websites.

1.4 set the scene for the project in the context of the end user

Candidates will describe the prospective end user.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will provide a profile of the end user of their building project, detailing anticipated wishes and demands. They may choose to research end users in similar facilities both physically and operationally.

1.5 write a mission statement for the project

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will determine clear values, objectives and outcomes for their project, ideally working as a team to identify key themes, for example purpose, environmental impact, design  excellence, sustainability, economic contribution. Candidates might gain inspiration by exploring the mission statements of leading architecture, engineering and construction companies.

2. The candidate will set standards for sustainability in a construction project

I can:

2.1 define commitments to positively impact on the local community and the local environment

Candidates will produce a community and environmental statement.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will produce a statement which outlines their commitment to positively impact the local community and the local environment not only in terms of the building itself and its entire lifecycle, but also through the ethos, behaviour and passion of the entire project team in caring for the community and protecting the environment in the immediate vicinity of the project.  This should be based on referenced research evidence.   A series of Construction Commitments devised by the Strategic Forum for Construction provides valuable guidance (http://www.strategicforum.org.uk/).

2.2 define commitments to energy and water efficiency and reduction of carbon emissions

Candidates will produce an energy, water and carbon statement based on research.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will produce a statement which outlines their commitment to energy and water efficiency, and to reduce carbon emissions throughout the entire lifecycle of the building, and also through the ethos, behaviour and passion of the entire project team. This should be based on referenced research evidence. A series of Construction Commitments devised by the Strategic Forum for Construction provides valuable guidance (http://www.strategicforum.org.uk/)WRAP (Waste and Resources Action Programme) provides valuable guidance: http://www.wrap.org.uk/category/sector/construction

2.3 define commitments to minimise construction waste

Candidates will produce a waste statement based on research.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will produce a statement which outlines their commitment to waste minimisation throughout the entire lifecycle of the building, and also through the ethos, behaviour and passion of the entire project team. This should be based on referenced research evidence.   A series of Construction Commitments devised by the Strategic Forum for Construction provides valuable guidance (http://www.strategicforum.org.uk/) WRAP (Waste and Resources Action Programme) provides valuable guidance: http://www.wrap.org.uk/category/sector/construction

2.4 define commitments to ethical sourcing of materials and responsible procurement

Candidates will produce a procurement statement based on research and their personal ethics.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will produce a statement which outlines their commitment to ethical sourcing and responsible procurement throughout the entire lifecycle of the building, and also through the ethos, behaviour and passion of the entire project team. This statement should be based on referenced research including information from the Strategic Forum for Construction. A series of Construction Commitments devised by the Strategic Forum for Construction provides valuable guidance (http://www.strategicforum.org.uk/). WRAP (Waste and Resources Action Programme) provides valuable guidance: http://www.wrap.org.uk/category/sector/construction.

2.5 define sustainability monitoring and reporting procedures for the lifecycle of the project

Candidates will define their methods for monitoring and reporting their commitments to sustainability throughout the entire lifecycle of the project.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should explore existing industry procedures to produce a methodology. Valuable guidance can be found by registering with BREEAM, an internationally recognised measure and mark of a building’s sustainable qualities, and certified buildings are immediately identifiable as having been planned, designed, constructed and operated in accordance with best practice sustainability principles. Click on the Resources tab at: http://www.breeam.org/.

3. The candidate will be able to define site information required at pre-design phase

I can:

3.1 identify the importance of site analysis and the roles of professional consultants at pre design phase

Candidates will produce an overview of site analysis requirements and the professionals involved at pre-design stage.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will understand the importance of an adequate site investigation and describe who and what is involved, and why it is carried out. They will outline the risks involved in gathering insufficient or inadequate data.

3.2 determine what topographical information is required and appropriate, effective ways to collect accurate data for a particular site

Candidates can explain the need for an accurate topographical survey and can suggest and validate an appropriate survey method.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will understand the role of the topographical surveyor in providing accurate survey data. They will explore the limitations of everyday mapping information (e.g. conventional ordnance survey maps) in providing accurate geotechnical data and how technology has advanced the methods of surveying. Candidates will compare methodologies and technologies and will determine appropriate above ground survey methods for their project  including laser scanning, satellite based positioning systems (GPS/GNSS), electronic distance measurement (total station), Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) for below ground utility mapping. Candidates will define appropriate vertical/horizontal accuracy and understand the need for precision to establish boundaries, elevation for flood plain data, positioning of trees, water courses and other natural features, existing buildings and manmade features, and also the need to discover existing utilities running through and adjacent to the site. They will explore the limitations of surveying tools, for example GPS requires good satellite geometry and visibility. Tree canopies and dense, built up areas can render GPS methods ineffective. Total stations can produce unreliable data when used in highly reflective and laser Scanning: can produce poor results on low-reflectance surfaces (e.g., anything painted black), specular surfaces (e.g., shiny metal and mirrors), and transparent or translucent surfaces (e.g., windows). All methods require professional expertise and varying degrees of time to process collected data and candidates will understand the process of translating collected data to a useable, manageable format, and the data outputs produced by different methods (e.g. laser scan point clouds, GPS/EDM raw data).

3.3 identify information required to produce a geotechnical report and relate to the specified project

Candidates can identify the geotechnical data required to produce a report.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will understand the role of the geotechnical surveyor in providing accurate ground condition information regarding soil and geologic conditions on and below the surface. They will understand the process of site analysis through desk study, survey and reporting.

3.4 identify information required to produce an ecological study and relate to the specified project

Candidates can identify the ecological data required to produce a report.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will understand the role of the ecology professional in providing accurate information regarding vegetation and wildlife and their habitats in the local area. They will understand the process of site analysis through desk study, survey and reporting.

3.5 identify information required to produce a hydrology study and relate to the specified project

Candidates can identify the hydrological data required to produce a report

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will understand the role of the hydrology professional in providing accurate information regarding the quality, position and flow of watercourses in the local area. They will understand the process of site analysis through desk study, survey and reporting.

UNIT 2: Developing a Sustainable Construction Project. 10 credits (60 GLH)

1. prepare a design brief and take steps to appoint an effective design team.

I can:

1.1 describe the role and responsibility of the client in a construction project

Candidates will describe the role and responsibility of the client in a construction project.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: The Client plays a major role in any construction project and has a wide range of responsibilities including ensuring that all appointees are competent and that suitable managers are appointed to oversee the project. He is also responsible for providing pre construction information, and ensuring that someone coordinates health and safety. Guidance can be found at http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110118095356/ http://www.cabe.org.uk/buildings/client-role/description

1.2 prepare the design brief for a specific construction project and receive critical feedback for client sign off

Candidates will prepare a design brief and present to a critical audience.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will prepare an effective, jargon-free design brief which conveys a client’s vision, their goals and their priorities and provides an accurate account of the project’s deliverables. The brief should refer to a budget estimate and realistic timeline and should confirm the main point of contact and decision maker(s). Operational management must be a key part of the brief. Candidates will present to an audience which will act as client in the development. The candidate must present with conviction and confidence and make appropriate adjustments on receiving critical feedback.

1.3 formalise the appointment of an integrated Project Team

Candidates will describe the formal appointment of an integrated Project Team.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should describe the engagement of an efficient, multidisciplinary team focusing on their ability to work together in a collaborative design environment driven by the benefits of Building Information Modelling. In addition to standard contracts (see http://www.jctltd.co.uk/), candidates should highlight the BIM Protocol, BIM Employer’s Information Requirements (EIR) and PAS1192:2 specification. Information regarding this can be found via the Government BIM Task Group website: http://www.bimtaskgroup.org/bim-protocol/

1.4 produce an organogram outlining professionals and their roles at each phase of the project

Candidates will produce an organogram outlining professionals and their roles at each phase of the project.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will outline key members of the Project Team with specific reference to the role of the Information Manager: http://cic.org.uk/download.php?f=outline-scope-of-services-for-the-role-of-info rmation-managment.pdf  They will draft a Project Programme outlining tasks and deliverables at each stage. The Royal Institute of British Architecture has produced a Plan of Work which offers clear guidance: http://www.architecture.com/Files/RIBAProfessionalServices/Practice/RIBAPl anofWork2013Overview.pdf

1.5 devise an effective communication strategy to promote collaboration between all parties

Candidates will produce an effective internal and external communication strategy

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will explain what they will need to communicate and how they will use BIM to support the communication process, through collaboration, integration and improving awareness, understanding and decision-making through a 3D model. They must ensure the project is on target at each stage to meet the client’s aims and objectives including quality and budget. Candidates may also consider the use of social media to assist stakeholders in keeping up to date with the project. How might a team use Twitter, Facebook and website Links and RSS feeds for people to subscribe to?

2. use building information modelling techniques for concept design

I can:

2.1 create preliminary concept designs based on design brief

Candidates will create a concept design based on the agreed design brief.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will produce a number of concept design options extracting key information from the design brief. They will understand the benefits of conceptual modelling as a critical stage of building design such as enabling  the communication of ideas and supporting early stage analysis for building life cycle sustainability and cost.

2.2 assess concept designs for space requirements, circulation and accessibility

Candidates will assess concept designs for space requirements, circulation and accessibility.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance:  Candidates will determine how their concept design maximises efficient and effective space use for those who will use it and how it facilitates the safe, convenient movement of people, both able bodied and disabled. They should define spatial requirements for a range of occupant activities and equipment and consider how the positioning of elements such as corridors, lifts, escalators, and staircases contribute to the optimisation of the flow of people through a building. They should be encouraged to explore the size of rooms and areas with specific purpose and it is useful to visit a building with a similar purpose to establish what works and what doesn’t, interviewing existing end users where possible. Candidates should consider building operations and maintenance activities and the potential need for flexibility to accommodate changes in future use and technologies. They should understand the project’s relationship with, and effective use, of the landscape in which it sits. Furthermore they should pay specific attention to statutory regulations concerning size, function, access etc.

2.3 assess concept design to produce preliminary cost and lifecycle cost prediction

Candidates will assess concept design to produce preliminary cost and lifecycle cost prediction.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will produce high level estimates based on number of occupants and area or volume on a standard £/m2 and £/m3 basis according to the type of project they have designed. Whilst this is a function that can be quickly carried out using industry software, candidates should understand the methodology behind calculation, the risks involved in estimation, and the impact of lifecycle costing on sustainability.

2.4 perform energy analysis relative to form, orientation, weather, surfaces and glazing

Candidates will perform energy analysis relative to form, orientation, weather, surfaces and glazing.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will produce a high level analysis of overall energy use. They will provide a solar study taking into account the shading effects of surrounding buildings where applicable and recommending ways to maximize solar gain. They will explore the effects of making changes to form and orientation to maximise energy efficiency and make comparisons. Whilst this is a function that can be quickly carried out using industry software, candidates should understand the methodology behind calculation, the risks involved in estimation, and the impact of analysis on sustainability.

2.5 present information for whole project lifecycle and provide validation for chosen model

Candidates will present a final concept model and provide whole project lifecycle validation.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will present an effective, efficient concept model which is most aligned to the project design brief, life cycle objectives and vision.

3. prepare information and resources needed to support a planning application.

I can:

3.1 explain the planning process for a specific construction project

Candidates will identify the sources of information which will provide a basis for a construction project.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: The ‘National Planning Policy Framework’ (see http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/planningandbuilding/nppf ) sets out planning policies for England and how they are expected to be applied. It provides guidance for local planning authorities and decision-takers, both in drawing up plans and making decisions about planning applications. See http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/planning/planningsystem/localplans#nppf It is important that candidates understand the need to involve the wider community in the process and the introduction of the ‘Localism Act’ and the new ‘Neighbourhood Planning’ framework empowers communities to have their say regarding development in their neighbourhoods. A guide to the Act and the powers of communities can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/fil e/5959/1896534.pdf If a construction project is classed as a ‘major development’ it is crucial that the community is involved at an early stage. There may be more evidence required, in particular an environmental impact assessment, a transport study which outlines the impact the site entry and exit will have on existing roads and traffic volumes, and a design & access statement, which outlines the suitability of the design for the particular site, and how users will access it. Large scale developments often include a commitment from the developer to provide community services such as providing a park for local children. This is called a Section 106 agreement and is a powerful, legally binding agreement between a local council and developer to improve the local area. Major developments can include:

  • Housing developments of more than 10 dwellings
  • Housing development on a site of 0.5 hectares or more
  • Any other development with a floor area of 1000 m2
  • Any other development on a site of 1 hectare or more
  • Waste development or mineral working

A planning authority will facilitate community consultation by notifying neighbouring properties about an application, and in some cases they planning applications will also be advertised in the local press and a site notice.

3.2 make use of current legislation and guidance

Candidates will identify the sources of information which will provide a basis for a planning application.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will align significant legislation to their specific project. Guidance can be found via the government planning website www.planningportal.gov.uk/ and a number of key points are noted below. Candidates should be aware of a number of Acts and codes of practice from Level 2 including Tree Preservation Orders (TPOs) and the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. The Disabled Persons Act 1981 and Disability Discrimination Act 1995 ensures that the needs of disabled persons are provided for in any development schemes. The Equality Act 2010 ensures that local planning policies need to take into account the particular needs of women, young people and children, older people, ethnic minorities, children and disabled people. The Party Wall Act 1996 prevents and resolves disputes in relation to party walls (walls of adjoining dwellings e.g. semi detached houses and terraces), boundary walls and excavations near neighbouring buildings. Right to Light – a private, legally enforceable easement or right to a minimum level of natural illumination through a ‘defined aperture’, usually a window opening. Planning applications must also be decided in accordance with the Local Development Framework (LDF), and information regarding this can be found at http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/planning/planningsystem/localplans Candidates should consider location specific policy – is the site situated in a green belt, or conservation area? It may be close to listed buildings (or indeed is the proposed project a refurbishment of a listed building?) or be situated in a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) which gives legal protection to local wildlife and specific geological formations. There are also a number of local Waste Management policies which should be adhered to. Building Regulations approval sets out design standards that focus on issues of health, safety, energy efficiency and disability access. It may also be necessary to notify the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and may have other duties as well under the Construction Design and Management Regulations 2007 (CDM 2007). Candidates will use BIM to model Health and Safety requirements. BREEAM and the Code for Sustainable Homes sets the standard for best practice in sustainable building design, construction and operation. The measures used represent a broad range of categories and criteria and include aspects related to energy and water use, the internal environment (health and well-being), pollution, transport, materials, waste, ecology and management processes. Much of this criteria is covered in Designing, Engineering and Constructing a Sustainable Built Environment at Level 1 and 2. More information about BREEAM can be found at http://www.breeam.org/about.jsp?id=66

3.3 prepare a planning feasibility study for a specific construction project

Candidates will prepare a planning feasibility study for a specific construction project.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will create a feasibility study outlining how their proposal will conform and respond to particular areas of policy and legislation.

3.4 describe what is meant by the term ‘undesirable precedent’ in planning decisions and provide an example of such

Candidates will identify and describe the impact of ‘undesirable precedent’.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will explain the term ‘undesirable precedent’ in the context of building design and impact on planning law/codes of practice. A large number of case studies can be found on the internet and candidates should provide an appropriate example aligned to their own project.

3.5 formulate justification and present evidence for the approval of a specific project

Candidates will formulate justification and present evidence for the approval of a specific project.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will include significant facts and provide appropriate evidence (e.g. site plans and design drawings (elevations, floor plans, sections). Planning authorities will focus on material considerations when deciding a planning which include:

  • Overlooking/loss of privacy
  • Loss of light or overshadowing
  • Parking
  • Highway safety
  • Traffic
  • Noise
  • Effect on listed building and conservation area
  • Layout and density of building
  • Design, appearance and materials
  • Government policy
  • Disabled persons’ access
  • Proposals in the Development Plan
  • Previous planning decisions (including appeal decisions)
  • Nature conservation

Further information is available on the UK website http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/

UNIT 3: Support Design, Structural and Services aspects of a Sustainable Construction Project. 10 credits (60 GLH)

1. use building information modelling techniques to develop the design.

I can:

1.1 define design elements and operational practicalities to provide key information for the basis of a building information model

Candidates will produce key information to produce a building information model.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Using information gathering during the completion of previous units, candidates should create a report of key features concerning the architectural and operational principles of the project. They should be able to relate this to scientific and mathematical competence in relevant areas.

1.2 create an architectural model using materials with specific properties relevant to a sustainable construction project

Candidates will produce a building information model using appropriate materials and objects.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Using information gathering during the completion of previous units, candidates should create a model based on the use of appropriate sustainable materials and objects. Autodesk Revit Architecture offers object libraries and families where candidates can select a range of doors, walls, windows etc. All objects are created in a parametric environment allowing candidates to insert and edit dimensional and geometric constraints (i.e. change the length of a wall and move//rotate it into the required position. A range of objects can also be sourced and downloaded free of charge from the internet e.g. www.nationalbimlibrary.com, www.bimstore.co.uk, www.revitstore.com. Construction suppliers are increasingly providing BIM objects, and these can also be sourced from the internet.

1.3 validate sustainable design ideas through production of data rich detailed 3D information

Candidates can validate design ideas using building information modelling technology.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will use a range of building performance analysis tools to assess and validate their design ideas. They should ensure that they have introduced a level of detail that facilitates accurate assessment.

1.4 present the model to critical experts

Candidates will present the model to critical experts in the context of architecture.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should present appropriate information and visualisations to enable a critical audience to assess the model. Professionals should be invited to critique the model and candidates should be assisted in preparing to answer questions.

1.5 address errors, clashes and omissions and make modifications as a result of feedback

Candidates will make improvements to their model following professional feedback.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should act upon professional constructive feedback and demonstrate design, organisation and performance improvements as a result. They should ensure that building systems do not clash and understand the potential outcome of late identification (i.e. at construction/post construction phase). They should be proficient with quantitative measures and understand appropriate precision and use of units and standard form where appropriate.

2. use building information modelling techniques to develop structural elements of a building project.

I can:

2.1 define and create data rich structural elements including foundations, structural walls, slabs, beams and columns

Candidates will produce a building information model using appropriate structural elements.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Using information gathering during the completion of previous units, candidates should create a report of key features concerning structural performance of the project. They should create a model based on the use of appropriate structural elements and objects. Autodesk Revit Architecture offers object libraries and families where candidates can select a range of foundations, structural walls, beams, columns etc. All objects are created in a parametric environment allowing candidates to insert and edit dimensional and geometric constraints (i.e. change the length of a beam and move//rotate it into the required position. A Page 72 range of objects can also be sourced and downloaded free of charge from the internet e.g. www.nationalbimlibrary.com, www.bimstore.co.uk, www.revitstore.com. Construction suppliers are increasingly providing BIM objects, and these can also be sourced from the internet.

2.2 apply science and mathematics to structural specifications

Candidates will understand and apply mathematical techniques to process data for a variety of structural design and engineering related problems.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will calculate structural elements of their project. Classwork should involve theory, worked examples and practice to produce evidence as methodical worked calculations, graphical solutions and other scientific and mathematical exercises. Every attempt should be made to provide industry based scenarios relevant to learners’ vocational aims, and the introduction of professionals to support learners in the classroom is hugely beneficial and should be considered. Candidates will understand algebraic and trigonometric relationships, simple addition and resolution of vectors, exponential and logarithmic functions, and will understand fundamental scientific principles within structural engineering including moments of inertia, load, shear, tension, forces, loads, elasticity, stress and strain and thermal expansion.

2.3 validate structural engineering methods through production of data rich detailed 3D information

Candidates can validate structural design ideas using building information modelling technology.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will use a range of building performance analysis tools to assess and validate their design ideas. They should ensure that they have introduced a level of detail that facilitates accurate and meaningful assessment in realistic real world scenarios. They should be able to explain the physical properties of their construction using evidence from the data in the model.

2.4 present the model to critical experts

Candidates will present the model to critical experts in the context of structural engineering.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should present appropriate information and visualisations to enable a critical audience to assess their model. Professionals should be invited to critique the model and candidates should be assisted in preparing to answer questions.

2.5 address errors, clashes and omissions and make modifications as a result of feedback

Candidates will make improvements to their model following professional feedback.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should act upon professional constructive feedback and demonstrate design, organisation and performance improvements as a result. They should ensure that building systems do not clash and understand the potential outcome of late identification (i.e. at construction/post construction phase).

3. use building information modelling techniques to develop building services elements of a building project.

I can:

3.1 define and create appropriate systems from prior research, concept analysis and operational practicalities and constraints

Candidates will produce a building information model using appropriate building services systems.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Using information gathering during the completion of previous units, candidates should create a report of key features concerning energy efficiency and lifecycle operation and maintenance. They should create a model based on the use of appropriate building services elements and objects. Autodesk Revit Architecture offers object libraries and families where candidates can select a range of building services components e.g. pipes and ducts. All objects are created in a parametric environment allowing candidates to insert and edit dimensional and geometric constraints (i.e. change the length of a beam and move//rotate it into the required position. A range of objects can also be sourced and downloaded free of charge from the internet e.g. www.nationalbimlibrary.com, www.bimstore.co.uk, www.revitstore.com. Construction suppliers are increasingly providing BIM objects, and these can also be sourced from the internet.

3.2 apply science and mathematics to assess and calculate energy efficiency in a range of scenarios

Candidates will understand and apply mathematical techniques to process data for a variety of building services engineering related problems.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will calculate the efficiency of a system using project data and classwork should involve theory, worked examples and practice to produce evidence as methodical worked calculations, graphical solutions and other scientific and mathematical exercises. Every attempt should be made to provide industry based scenarios relevant to learners’ vocational aims, and the introduction of professionals to support learners in the classroom is hugely beneficial and should be considered. Candidates will understand algebraic and trigonometric relationships, vectors, exponential and logarithmic functions, and will understand fundamental scientific principles within building services engineering including thermodynamics, heat transfer, thermodynamics, electricity, combustion and psychrometry, acoustics and light levels.

3.3 validate building services proposals through production of data rich detailed 3D information

Candidates can validate building services design ideas using building information modelling technology.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will use a range of building performance analysis tools to assess and validate their design ideas. They should ensure that they have introduced a level of detail that facilitates accurate assessment.

3.4 present the model to critical experts

Candidates will present the model to critical experts in the context of building services engineering.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should present appropriate information and visualisations to enable a critical audience to assess the model. Professionals should be invited to critique the model and candidates should be assisted in preparing to answer questions.

3.5 address errors, clashes and omissions and make modifications as a result of feedback

Candidates will make improvements to their model following professional feedback.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should act upon professional constructive feedback and demonstrate design, organisation and performance improvements as a result. They should ensure that building systems do not clash and understand the potential outcome of late identification (i.e. at construction/post construction phase).

UNIT 4: Lifecycle and Financial planning for a Sustainable Construction Project. 10 credits (60 GLH)

1. use building information modelling techniques to support the operational management of a building.

I can:

1.1 explain the role of BIM in the operation, management and maintenance of a sustainable building project throughout its lifecycle

Candidates will explain the role of BIM in the context of whole life facilities management.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will describe the benefits of developing and maintaining lifecycle data to support the effective, efficient operation, management and maintenance of a building. Data defines the precise location and condition of systems, equipment and objects found in a building (for example lighting, air conditioning, electrical and plumbing systems, fire protection, IT, furniture), and relationships between one component and another. They should understand how information is created and updated throughout the design and construction phase, and how it can be monitored and constantly refreshed throughout the building’s lifetime to provide an up to date, real time ‘as built’ model. This model can be used to reduce energy usage, monitor life cycle costs, reduce the amount of time required for modification/repair/replacement/ renewal of objects/systems and critically provide a clear picture of how effectively an end user is using the building. Candidates should be able to provide examples of efficiencies and suggest how ongoing data evaluation can impact the future of building design.

1.2 devise an appropriate handover process from the construction team to the end user

Candidates will devise an appropriate handover process from the construction team to the end user.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will further develop knowledge gained in Level 1 and 2 qualifications regarding effective end user behaviour and should devise an effective strategy for end user handover to promote the optimum operational performance of a building. The strategy should include an end user training programme designed to educate users and operators in how they should use the building to support lifecycle efficiencies and positive social, economic and environmental outcomes. Candidates should also devise a strategy to monitor, evaluate and report outcomes. The UK Government’s ‘Soft Landings’ concept provides further guidance on effective handover: see http://www.bimtaskgroup.org/gsl/.

1.3 set targets for whole life energy performance, water consumption, waste reduction, operation and maintenance costs

Candidates will set targets for building lifecycle efficiency.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will produce and validate a clear set of targets for their building focusing on energy use, water consumption, waste reduction and operation and maintenance costs. Candidates should consider local, national and global policies and protocols, and research existing local case studies to determine how targets are set, measured and reported, and their effectiveness over time.

1.4 analyse the impact of post occupancy behaviour on the lifecycle of a building

Candidates will understand the impact of post occupancy evaluation on building lifecycle.

Evidence: :Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should discuss quantitative and qualitative end user/operator data and how this information can provide a measurement of the success (or failure) of a building project. Candidates should discuss the analysis of data to inform the design process and real life building performance prediction.

1.5 describe the benefits of early engagement of the Facilities Manager and the client/end user in the design process

Candidates can describe the benefits of early engagement of the Facilities Manager and the client/end user in the design process.

Evidence: portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will discuss the role of the Facilities Manager and the client/end user in early stage building design in contributing key knowledge and experience in the use, operation and maintenance of a building.

2. understand cost analysis and financial control.

I can:

2.1 explain the role of BIM in the financial management of a building project

Candidates will understand the role of BIM in the financial management of a building project.

Evidence: portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will understand the role and effectiveness of BIM in producing accurate building project cost information including cost plans, bills of quantities and estimates. They should discuss accuracy, time and cost savings, financial transparency, and also the ability to update cost information automatically when making modifications to the building model.

2.2 produce a cost model based on the project timeline

Candidates will produce a cost model based on the project timeline.

Evidence: portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will generate a detailed cost plan from their building model in line with original budget and timeline objectives.

2.3 identify points of accountability for keeping the project to budget

Candidates will identify points of accountability for keeping the project to budget.

Evidence: portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will identify key project stages and associated cost centres and the roles responsible for their impact on the budget and final project cost.

2.4 explain the consequences of weaknesses in financial control

Candidates will explain the consequences of weaknesses in financial control.

Evidence: portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will understand the impact of poor financial management and reporting and should discuss the bank account and reconciliation, assets and liabilities, cashflow, invoicing, supply chain management, resolution of errors, resource prediction and allocation.

2.5 devise policies for sustainable procurement to establish audit trails

Candidates will devise policies for sustainable procurement to establish audit trails.

Evidence: portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will establish procedures for sustainable procurement which provides a clear audit trail and promotes responsible sourcing based on whole life costing principles. They should consider social, economic and environmental impact and compliance with environmental legislation and regulation.

3. produce a budget for a complex building project.

I can:

3.1 compile an accurate list of capital costs

Candidates will compile an accurate list of capital costs.

Evidence: portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will provide a definition of capital costs for a construction project and compile a list referenced to their building project. Capital costs include expenses related to the initial establishment of a building and include land purchase, planning and feasibility studies, architectural and engineering design, construction (including materials, equipment and labour), construction management, insurance, tax, inspections and testing, equipment and furnishings not including in the building (e.g. site office furniture and IT).

3.2 provide an annual projection for recurrent fixed costs

Candidates will provide an annual projection for recurrent fixed costs.

Evidence: portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will provide a definition of fixed costs for a construction project and provide an annual projection for recurrent fixed costs referenced to their building project. Recurrent fixed costs are regular, anticipated costs and are independent of the output or activity level. They include permanent office utilities, permanent staff wages, bank interest, leasing costs.

3.3 provide an annual projection for recurrent variable costs

Candidates will provide an accurate annual projection for variable costs.

Evidence: portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will provide a definition of variable costs for a construction project and provide an annual projection for recurrent variable costs referenced to their building project. Recurrent variable costs are irregular, often unanticipated costs that change during the project’s lifecycle. They include temporary site labour, subcontractors, materials and equipment and fuel.

3.4 provide a sensitivity analysis based on possible variations in costs

Candidates will provide a sensitivity analysis based on possible variations in costs.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: With an emphasis on sustainability and energy efficiency, candidates will carry out a sensitivity analysis, testing the cost effective potential of a building project throughout its lifecycle by modifying a number of design objects within the model.

3.5 present and negotiate variations to the design within budget constraints

Candidates will present and negotiate variations to the design within budget constraints.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will present and validate design recommendations to a professional audience. They will use the outcomes of the dialogue to make variations that optimise their designs within the constraints of the budget.

Unit 5: Evaluating and Documenting a Sustainable Construction Project 10 credits (60 GLH)

I can:

1. make objective comparisons between construction methods.

1.1 compare construction methods on the basis of aesthetics and appropriateness to design intent

Candidates will produce a construction method evaluation on the basis of aesthetics and appropriateness to design intent.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will consider a range of construction techniques and make comparisons based on aesthetics. The end user and/or client will have a personal view on what is aesthetically pleasing (i.e. is a delightful/beautiful building) and perhaps here the candidate could collaborate with peers or seek the comments of a professional visitor. Design intent was established in the formulation of a design brief in Unit 1, and again, candidates should conform to the brief when evaluating construction methods. Candidates should present evaluations in a written report.They will come to specific conclusions and present these as judgements that are supported by the evidence.

1.2 compare construction methods on the basis of cost

Candidates will produce a construction method evaluation on the basis of cost

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Based on research undertaken throughout the course, candidates should present evaluations in a written report in their portfolios that presents the evidence and comparisons in a clearly understandable format. They will come to specific conclusions and and present these as judgements that are supported by the evidence.

1.3 compare construction methods on the basis of sustainability

Candidates will compare construction methods on the basis of sustainability.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Based on research undertaken throughout the course, candidates should present evaluations in a written report in their portfolios that presents the evidence and comparisons in a clearly understandable format. They will come to specific conclusions and and present these as judgements that are supported by the evidence.

1.4 compare construction methods on the basis of endurance and reliability

Candidates will compare construction methods on the basis of endurance and reliability.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Based on research undertaken throughout the course, candidates should present evaluations in a written report in their portfolios that presents the evidence and comparisons in a clearly understandable format. They will come to specific conclusions and and present these as judgements that are supported by the evidence.

1.5 compare construction methods on the basis of reduction of operating costs

Candidates will compare construction methods on the basis of reduction of operating costs.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Based on research undertaken throughout the course, candidates should present evaluations in a written report  in their portfolios that presents the evidence and comparisons in a clearly understandable format. They will come to specific conclusions and and present these as judgements that are supported by the evidence.

2. Communicate outcomes from professional perspectives.

2.1 explain the strengths and weaknesses of the design from a facilities management perspective

Candidates will produce an evaluation of the building in the role of a facilities manager.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Based on research undertaken throughout the course, candidates should present evaluations in a written report. Guidance and evaluation may be sought through collaboration with peers and/or from a visiting professional.

2.2 explain the strengths and weaknesses of the design from an architectural perspective

Candidates will produce an evaluation of the building in the role of an architect.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Based on research undertaken throughout the course, candidates should present evaluations in a written report. Guidance and evaluation may be sought through collaboration with peers and/or from a visiting professional.

2.3 explain the strengths and weaknesses of the design from a structural engineering perspective

Candidates will produce an evaluation of the building in the role of a structural engineer.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Based on research undertaken throughout the course, candidates should present evaluations in a written report. Guidance and evaluation may be sought through collaboration with peers and/or from a visiting professional.

2.4 explain the strengths and weaknesses of the design from a building services engineering perspective

Candidates will produce an evaluation of the building in the role of a building services engineer.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Based on research undertaken throughout the course, candidates should present evaluations in a written report. Guidance and evaluation may be sought through collaboration with peers and/or from a visiting professional.

2.5 explain the strengths and weaknesses of the design from an end user perspective

Candidates will produce an evaluation of the building in the role of an end user.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Based on research undertaken throughout the course, candidates should present evaluations in a written report. Guidance and evaluation may be sought through collaboration with peers and/or from a visiting professional. Candidates are particularly encouraged to present their design to a group of end users who operate in a similar existing facility.

3. make a presentation of a summary report to a critical audience.

3.1 support a presentation with appropriate digital technologies

Candidates will present their project using appropriate digital technology.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will present a project summary to a group of professionals. They should provide an assessment (and make recommendations where appropriate) of the selected technology they have adopted in terms of functionality, ease of use, reliability, flexibility, accuracy, responsiveness, availability of appropriate tools, how realistic, visualisation capability, speed, collaboration opportunity, interoperability, import/export functionality, compatibility with existing hardware.”]

3.2 compare the client brief to the finished project and communicate to a professional audience.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will present a project summary to a group of professionals. They should focus on key elements of the design brief and provide an honest evaluation of their ability to adhere to the brief.

3.3 compare social, economic and environmental outcomes with planned intentions

Candidates will compare sustainable outcomes to planned intentions.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will present a project summary to a group of professionals. They should focus on key elements of their commitments to sustainability outlined in Unit 1 and provide an honest evaluation of their ability to confirm to these commitments.

3.4 assess and validate the project’s major strengths and weaknesses with supporting evidence

Candidates will present an evaluation of strengths and weaknesses.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will present a project summary to a group of professionals. They should focus on key strengths and weaknesses and provide an honest evaluation. Strengths could focus in a number of areas, for example a candidate might comment on a particular sustainable feature, or an ability to demonstrate innovate design solutions for a particular purpose. Conversely a candidate may feel his/her technical ability restricted creativity or they lacked confidence to present their project in an articulate, informed manner.

3.5 make clear judgements about the success of the project and lessons learned for the future

Candidates will present an evaluation of the project.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will present a project summary to a group of professionals. They should focus on providing an honest evaluation of their experience, their aptitude for certain skills and the lessons they have learned, or still need to learn, for the next project they undertake. They should comment on their aspirations for the future, and how they see their place in the industry.

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