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Criteria & Learning Outcomes – Level 1

TQUK Level 1 Certificate in Design, Engineer, Construct! The Digital Built Environment (RQF) – QAN: 603/1991/4

Assessor's Guide to interpreting the Level 1 criteria

General Information

QCF general description for Level 1 qualifications

  • QCF general description for Level 1 qualifications
  • Achievement at QCF level 1 (EQF Level 2) reflects the ability to use relevant knowledge, skills and procedures to complete
    routine tasks. It includes responsibility for completing tasks and procedures subject to direction or guidance.
  • Use knowledge of facts, procedures and ideas to complete welldefined, routine tasks. Be aware of information relevant to the
    area of study or work
  • Complete well-defined routine tasks. Use relevant skills and procedures. Select and use relevant information. Identify
    whether actions have been effective.
  • Take responsibility for completing tasks and procedures subject to direction or guidance as needed

Requirements

  • Standards must be confirmed by a trained Level 1 Assessor or higher
  • Assessors must at a minimum record assessment judgements as entries in the online mark book on the INGOTs.org
    certification site.
  • Routine evidence of work used for judging assessment outcomes in the candidates’ records of their day to day work will
    be available from their e-portfolios and online work. Assessors should ensure that relevant web pages are available to their
    Account Manager on request by supply of the URL.
  • When the candidate provides evidence of matching all the criteria to the specification, subject to the guidance below, the assessor can request the award using the link on the certification site. The Account Manager will request a random
    sample of evidence from candidates’ work that verifies the assessor’s judgement.
  • When the Account Manager is satisfied that the evidence is sufficient to safely make an award, the candidate’s success will
    be confirmed and the unit certificate will be printable from the web site.
  • Each unit at Level 1 has recommended guided learning hours based on time required to complete by an average learner.

Assessment Method

Assessors can score each of the criteria N, L, S or H. N indicates no evidence and it is the default setting. L indicates some capability but some help still required to meet the standard. S indicates that the candidate can match the criterion to its required specification in keeping with the overall level descriptor. H indicates performance that goes beyond the expected in at least some aspects. Candidates are required to achieve at least S on all the criteria to achieve the full unit award. Once the candidate has satisfied all the criteria by demonstrating practical competence in realistic contexts they achieve the unit certificate.

UNIT 1: Defining a Sustainable Construction Project. 3 credits (20 GLH) – F/615/8822

1. The candidate will understand issues related to sustainability in construction projects.

I can:

1.1 define sustainability

Candidates should be able to define sustainability in keeping with personal interpretation of accepted definitions.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should familiarise themselves with the range of definitions of sustainability and sustainable development, including those most used in the global context (e.g. the Brundtland Report), and those used nationally and locally. They should be able to define sustainability in the sense of what it means to them personally.

1.2 identify ways in which sustainability affects the local community

Candidates should identify several ways in which sustainability issues affect their local community.

Evidence: Portfolio of evidence, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should explore ways in which their local community is affected by issues of sustainability. They can investigate how local systems operate and research the environmental, economic and social health benefits of creating a more sustainable future. They can investigate the ways electricity, water, sewage treatment, refuse collection and other council services are provided, and how sustainable these services are. They can analyse human behaviour in their school and community with regard to recycling, litter, wellbeing, tolerance, inclusion and social cohesion.

1.3 identify the range and depth of knowledge in my local community related to sustainability

Candidates should be able to identify specific aspects of strengths and weaknesses in community environmental behaviour and attitudes.

Evidence: Community surveys, interview transcripts, reports in portfolio.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should devise a questionnaire and encourage their community to participate in their research to ensure that a wide range of data is collected. They should investigate how people feel about sustainability, whether they are adopting measures to be more sustainable and indeed whether they value a more sustainable lifestyle. Enquiries should be made to official figures, councillors and community leaders to investigate sustainable leadership. Candidates should evaluate strengths and weaknesses in social, economic and environmental behaviour and conditions in the community, and where possible, compare this data with other communities.

1.4 present sustainability issues to a relevant audience

Candidates should demonstrate the capacity to make a practical presentation on the subject of sustainability.

Evidence: Reports, video, information boards in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should present their findings in an appropriate manner. This can include verbal, written and electronic media.

1.5 identify and communicate ways of improving sustainability in my local community

Candidates should communicate methods, strategies and actions that could be used to improve sustainability in the local community.

Evidence: Reports, video, information boards, classroom/assembly/community presentations.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should devise an appropriate method of communication to educate and encourage their local community to be more sustainable.

2. The candidate will understand issues related to the local community in a construction project.

I can:

2.1 use a range of methods to discover who lives in my local community and suggest ways to demonstrate results

Candidates should be supported to find and use appropriate sources of age 61information to discover the nature of their community.

Evidence: Presentation of community surveys, interviews, reports, research, census information in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should devise an appropriate method to research demographic information. They can use web based information such as the UK National Statistics hub via http://www.statistics.gov.uk/hub/regional-statistics/index.html or find other local census information from local authority websites and offices. At level 1 they will need structured guidance.

2.2 engage the community in the design and planning processes of a building project in their role as ‘client’

Candidates should devise an appropriate method to engage their local community to contribute towards a vision for a community eco classroom.

Evidence: Transcripts/recordings of interviews, role play.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should devise an appropriate method to engage their local community to contribute towards a vision for a community eco classroom. Parents and other family members may be invited to contribute at this stage. Candidates may devise a social media strategy e.g. using Facebook and Twitter to reach the community.

2.3 respond to identified community needs with specific solutions

Candidates should consider the issues related to accessibility of the meeting with targeted solutions.

Evidence: Reports in portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should consider how they will engage and include those who may not be able to attend meetings or have access to the internet, e.g. those at work during the day, the elderly, parents with small children, disabled and those who do not speak English.

2.4 research the impact of a construction project on the local community

Candidates will devise and carry out a small scale research exercise to discover the impact of their project on the community.

Evidence: Portfolio of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should devise an appropriate method to research impact on the local environment and community. They should investigate how to persuade others by building trust and try to empathise, understanding how different members of the community might react to their project. Will they see it as a useful building, or a white elephant? They should provide reasons and justifications, exploring a range of issues. They might investigate other similar established community projects through local media and internet research. At level 1 they will need structured support.

2.5 understand how a formal meeting should be structured, conducted and recorded

Candidates should demonstrate understanding of formal meetings, their structure and the importance of accurate recording.

Evidence: Video/recorded discussion in the context of a client meeting and written evidence in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will set up a mock steering group and assign governing roles and responsibilities. They should take minutes, and understand why keeping an accurate record and advising stakeholders is critical to the success of the project. They should establish the aim of the group and prepare a group plan. At the end of a meeting, they should set an agenda and agree a method of publicising the minutes to the community.

UNIT 2: Roles in Construction Teams. 7 credits (60 GLH) – L/615/8824

1. The candidate will understand the importance of teams in construction projects.

I can:

1.1 relate successful construction projects to team effort

Candidates should be able to identify the key benefits of teamwork and and relate these to construction projects.

Evidence: From assessor observations, video/recorded discussion.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will discuss the merits of working as a team and the skills and benefits of integration, communication and sharing ideas. Successful project development and delivery stems from a range of professionals working closely together with the client to achieve a greater outcome than working independently. A successful team collaborates from start to finish. Examples of good teamwork can come from anywhere – sport, expedition, the running of a successful school. Roles will include generic skills such as leadership, researcher, evaluator as well as specific professional skills to make the team work.

1.2 identify the roles and responsibilities of the key members in a construction team

Candidates will investigate a range of professional roles in the built environment and their contribution to the eco classroom project.

Evidence: Portfolios and local testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will investigate a range of professional roles in the built environment and their contribution to the eco classroom project. At level 1 candidates should be able to link roles to responsibilities if given a list, and work out what might happen if a particular role is missing or weak. Who will be project leader? What special responsibilities do they have?

1.3 identify how each team member contributes to the sustainability of the project

Candidates should appreciate the function of each team member with a focus on sustainability.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence and internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will investigate the function of each team member and how each might contribute to the ongoing sustainability of the project. They will promote positive behaviour and excellent governance practices throughout the lifecycle of the project. For example, as an easy target, the team may agree to limit the use of paper, car share to site visits, hold meetings by Skype or similar, and commit to a range of energy efficiency and waste reduction measures. Candidates will encourage the team to lead by example, influencing suppliers and opting for sustainable products and services wherever possible.

2. The candidate will understand the role of the architect.

I can:

2.1 outline the role of an architect

Candidates will be able to write down the key responsibilities of the architect and his/her contribution to the project and to the team.

Evidence: From assessor observations, portfolios and internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will be able to describe the key responsibilities of the architect and his/her contribution to the project and to the team. At level 1 structured support can be given with appropriate clues or prompts.

2.2 explain how the architect works with a client on a building project

Candidates will be able to articulate the architect/client relationship in simple terms.

Evidence: Recordings or written explanation in portfolios, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will be able to describe the architect/client relationship including the need for the client to specify what is required and the need of the architect to point out implications such as cost, legal issues, aesthetics, environment and other professional issues.

2.3 identify the key elements and structure of a design brief

Candidates should be familiar with the key elements and structure of a design brief.

Evidence: Preparation of an outline document

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will be able to describe the requirements and functions of the eco classroom from previous research and communications with the client (their local community). The brief may include simple sketches and a checklist to reinforce principles and ideas. Level 1 candidates will require structured support in the form of organising their work to add detail to the brief.

2.4 use precedents to inform research

Candidates should understand the term “precedent”.

Evidence: Sketches, photographic examples and preparation of a brief overview of selected precedents.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will research local, national and global examples of existing eco structures to help them understand the works of other architects and aid them to create their own eco classroom design.

2.5 explain that a design brief requires clear and effective communication with the client

Candidates should recognise the characteristics of a design brief in terms of simple and clear communication.

Evidence: From assessor observations, video.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will outline the need for an effective, jargon-free design brief which conveys a client’s vision, their goals and their priorities and provides an accurate account of the project’s deliverables. They should understand that the brief is the most important piece of information between an architect and a client and effectively form a contract between the two. Time, effort and accuracy is required to create a good brief, which, in the long run, can save time and money, and be the starting point to an effective architect/client relationship. The brief should refer to a budget estimate realistic timeline and should confirm the main point of contact and decision maker(s), referenced to the community steering group.

2.6 respond to identified community needs with specific solutions

The candidate will show the capacity to respond positively to community needs based on objective research.

Evidence: From assessor observations, presentation to client representative(s), role play and content of portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will demonstrate they have acknowledged community needs by produce an ideas board which represents and summarises their recommendations identified through previous and ongoing research. They should reflect a sense of community and ownership using graphical solutions. Level 1 candidates will need structured guidance.

2.7 provide a simple concept model and sketch scheme

Candidates demonstrate an ability to communicate broad concepts using a model or models.

Evidence: Sketch scheme, model in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates can produce a simple scale model (e.g.cardboard) to give their community a sense of size, space and form. It is recommended that candidates include scale ‘people’. Models can be small and not very detailed, but would generally show the entrance, circulation (how people move from one space to another e.g. corridors, stairs, lifts), basic structure and envelope (the physical barrier between outside and inside environment e.g. roof, walls, windows and doors). A sketch scheme will help communicate ideas visually to the community, and should include mood boards and sketches outlining the proposed project.

2.8 present a case for a specified construction project

The candidate will present a credible case for a construction project backed by evidence.

Evidence: Recorded verbal presentation, examples of scheme in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should summarise their research and use their evidence as the basis for their sustainable recommendations and proposed design. At this point, it is recommended that professionals are invited to take part in the preparation and delivery of these presentations, offering constructive criticism to the candidates as they develop their presentation skills. Candidates should be conscious of the language they use, that they do not use over complicated terminology, and so convey their design ideas to every possible member of the community. Presentations should be simple, but relevant – candidates might adopt an ‘elevator pitch’ style, thereby getting the client excited about their eco classroom in a maximum of 30 seconds and in 130 words or fewer! Most of all, the presentation should be delivered assertively, confident in the knowledge that the project has immense benefits for the local community. At level 1 structured coaching and support is expected.

3. The candidate will understand the role of the building services engineer.

I can:

3.1 outline the role of the building services engineer

Candidates should be familiar with the main tasks undertaken by the building services engineer.

Evidence: Research, reporting recorded in portfolio.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will be able to list the key responsibilities of the building services engineer and his/her contribution to the project and to the team

3.2 identify services associated with a familiar building

Candidates should be able to identify the services provided in their own homes.

Evidence: 2D plan, digital floor plan in portfolio.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will prepare a floor plan sketch of their homes to identify existing services.

3.3 relate the behaviour of end users to impact on the efficiency of a building

Candidates should be able to relate the behaviour of users of the building to its energy efficiency

Evidence: Research, reporting in portfolio.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will keep a diary for one week which represents service related activity each day of that week. They are encouraged to record each event in a concise format from the moment they get up to the time they go to bed. This diary is used to highlight the impact of human behaviour on energy efficiency in a domestic dwelling. Through simple analysis in the classroom, candidates should devise ways of adapting their everyday habits to support sustainable living, and indeed be able to reflect on the way they operate in other buildings, e.g. school. They are encouraged to consider methods to promote sustainability.

3.4 recognise the symbols that represent building services on a plan

Candidates can identify industry standard symbols and relate them to what they represent.

Evidence: 2D plan, digital floor plan in portfolio.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will be able to recognise and annotate their drawings with industry standard symbols.

3.5 apply learning to own sustainable building design

Candidates should be able to identify features in their own designs that are a result of their learning.

Evidence: Verbal/written presentation in portfolio.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will be able to describe their own experiences and demonstrate how their discoveries have been implemented in their project. They should recognise that post occupancy behaviour has a critical impact on the success or failure of a building, no matter how energy efficient its design and construction.

4. The candidate will understand the role of the landscape designer.

I can:

4.1 outline the role of the landscape designer

Candidates should be familiar with the main tasks undertaken by the landscape designer.

Evidence: Research, reporting in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will be able to identify the key responsibilities of the landscape designer and his/her contribution to the project and to the team.

4.2 indicate how natural and manmade features impact the layout of a landscape design

Candidates should use a plan to indicate how natural and manmade features impact the layout of a landscape design.

Evidence: Sketch plan in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will identify an area of the school grounds or local community area as a basis for their design. They will sketch and label manmade and natural features and their impact on the overall existing environment in terms of aesthetics and how the landscape makes them feel. They should consider how a landscape can be designed to promote sustainable living in the local community, and whether the existing space supports this ethos.

4.3 relate the path of the sun to the positioning of natural and manmade garden design features

Candidates should be able to consider the position of the sun and its light when planning a garden.

Evidence: Sketch plans in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will mark the position of the sun at various times of the day on their plan, and determine its path from East to West, thereby determining areas of sun and shade and the impact on the installation of natural and manmade features.

4.4 make a water level to determine changes in height

Candidates should be able to make a water level.

Evidence: From assessor observations, recorded results in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will make a simple water level and record changes in height across an existing landscape.

4.5 relate the outdoor learning environment to the sustainable building project

Candidates should be able to identify the links between their building project and the wider opportunities to extend the learning space.

Evidence: Report documentation in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will demonstrate that the landscape designed for the community eco classroom acts as an extension to the building in terms of learning opportunities. For example, a growing area should determine that preparation and cooking areas should be included in the classroom design, and that it may provide storage space for gardening equipment. Further examples include specific areas which may require exhibition space, e.g. beehives in the garden supported by an exhibition inside the classroom to raise awareness of the decline in bees.

4.6 use characteristics of the school landscape as a basis for a detailed landscape plan

Candidates will prepare a final sketch plan or digital drawing of their eco garden based on observations, existing features and research.

Evidence: Sketch plan, digital drawing in portfolios

Additional information and guidance: Candidates at level 1 will need structured guidance in organising their evidence into a landscape plan.

5. The candidate will understand the role of the site engineer.

I can:

5.1 outline the role of a site engineer

The candidate should be able to identify the key characteristics of the role of a site engineer.

Evidence: Research, reporting documented in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will be able to identify the key responsibilities of the site engineer and his/her contribution to the project and to the team.

5.2 use specific mathematical solutions to inform site engineering problems

Candidates should be able to use simple geometry to support building calculations.

Evidence: Calculations in portfolios, internal testing.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will use Pythagoras Theorem to calculate the hypotenuse of a triangle of specified dimensions adjacent to the right angle i.e the xy dimensions of the eco classroom.

5.3 follow practical procedures to correctly position and orientate a building

Candidates should be able to follow a set of instructions including simple calculations to position a building.

Evidence: from assessor observations, plans and drawings in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will use their Pythagoras calculations to accurately position and mark the four corners of the eco classroom building footprint and orientate the longest baseline along an East-West direction.

6. The candidate will understand the role of the facilities manager.

I can:

6.1 outline the role of a facilities manager

Candidates will be able to describe the key responsibilities of the facilities manager and his/her contribution to the project and to the team

Evidence: Research, reporting, documentation in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Facilities managers are responsible for the management of services and processes that support the core business of an organisation. They ensure that an organisation has the most suitable working environment for its employees and their activities. Duties vary with the nature of the organisation, but facilities managers generally focus on using best business practice to improve efficiency, by reducing operating costs while increasing productivity.

This is a wide field with a diverse range of responsibilities, which are dependent on the structure and size of the organisation. Facilities managers are involved in both strategic planning and day-to-day operations, particularly in relation to buildings and premises. Likely areas of responsibility include:

  • procurement and contract management
  • building and grounds maintenance
  • cleaning
  • catering and vending
  • health and safety
  • security
  • utilities and communications infrastructure
  • space management
6.2 use empirical evidence to inform the sustainability of a school

Candidates should know that first hand evidence is available in their own school, how to obtain it and how to use it.

Evidence: Records and photographic evidence in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will investigate a number of factors which contribute to the sustainability of their own school. They will research where and why specific issues are found and who is responsible for its management, how they propose to resolve the issue and in what timescale.

6.3 gather information by interviewing school staff

Candidates should demonstrate the ability to gather information through interviews.

Evidence: Interviews recorded and/or documented in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Using a notepad, camera and recorder, candidates will interview key school staff and identify key areas to establish a range and impact of factors that contribute to the school’s sustainability. At this stage, it is anticipated that identified staff will support the initiative as part of a sustainable development plan for the school.

6.4 relate the behaviour of people within a building to the success of adoption and subsequent sustainability

Candidates should make an effective presentation in the required context.

Evidence: Verbal/written report/presentation files in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should prepare a summary presentation with text and photographs, and present their findings to the whole group. Their research is put into context of the school, student experiences and ambitions. Evidence should be presented to the school’s senior management team wherever possible. At level 1 support with structure will be needed.

6.5 relate evidence to the development of a building project

The candidate will identify strengths and weaknesses in their eco classroom based on research evidence.

Evidence: Written report. documentation in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will evaluate their project in relation to best practice opportunities in the context of their own eco classroom. Conversely they will identify issues which may be improved or avoided.

6.6 establish resource efficiency guidelines to support the facilities management role

Candidates should be provided the structure to produce a useful community guide in the principles of sustainability.

Evidence: Written report in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates, ideally with senior management support, should include their evidence in a guidebook to help parents, staff and students adopt their sustainability principles in the home and the school. This guide in effect becomes an instruction manual for facilities management within the school from the students’ perspective. As an extension possibility, candidates are encouraged to interrogate any existing publications and offer a comparison of their findings. Level 1 candidates will need support in structuring their documentation.

UNIT 3: Producing a Technical Design and Sharing Information. 3 credits (20 GLH) – R/615/8825

1. The candidate will use BIM to produce realistic buildings.

I can:

1.1 identify reasons why BIM is an essential process for development of a construction project

Candidates should recognise BIM as enabling the realistic modelling of buildings and the sharing of critical real-time information.

Evidence: Verbal/written report in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: They should investigate current local, national and international use, and government drivers for adoption across all built environment sectors. The UK Government website dedicated to BIM practice and protocol is http://www.bimtaskgroup.org/.

1.2 set up a 3D model using simple architectural and aesthetic elements

Candidates will use professional software to produce a building model.

Evidence: From assessor observations, creation of a 3D architectural model.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates, ideally with senior management support, should include their evidence in a guidebook to help community members get an insight into how buildings can be modelled. BIM software should be used, e.g. Autodesk Revit.

1.3 input, organise and combine information in a 3D environment

Candidates will prepare the resources they need in the 3D software environment to realise their model.

Evidence: From assessor observations, creation of a 3D architectural model.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will have completed reasonable research by this point and be in possession of the design brief, sketch schemes, building services data and aesthetic information. They are to introduce spaces/rooms which are included in their eco classroom design by drawing walls using specified materials to encompass the rooms which have been identified in the Brief. Areas should be calculated using standardised units (m2), rooms named, and doors added to demonstrate the flow of the building. Candidates should be encouraged to ‘test’ their designs by firstly estimating and then physically measuring rooms having a similar function within their school (e.g. disabled toilets, classrooms etc). They should research guidance specific to accommodation and inhabitants. Windows, curtain walling, floors, ceilings, roofs and furniture can be added and the external site can be modelled to include topography. BIM software should be used, e.g. Autodesk Revit.

1.4 define and produce floor plans, elevations, sections and visualisations

Candidates should be able to use the software to produce projections and rendering to provide realistic designs.

Evidence: From assessor observations, creation of a 3D architectural model.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will create 2D floor plans, elevations and sections, and also are to produce a realistic visualisation and render. BIM software should be used, e.g. Autodesk Revit.

1.5 create a drawing on a title sheet

Candidates will create their own fully annotated drawing sheet complete with floor plans, elevations and sections at a useful scale.

Evidence: From assessor observations, creation of a 2D drawing sheet.

Additional information and guidance: Level 1 candidates will require structured support. BIM software should be used, e.g. Autodesk Revit.

2. The candidate will be able to share information effectively.

I can:

2.1 demonstrate the value of professional collaboration and sharing information in a building project

Candidates should be able to navigate their model, and share ideas and information.

Evidence: From assessor observations, presentation of 3D model/crit/team presentation in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should demonstrate their appreciation of the client’s requirements through comparison to the 3D model. They should navigate around the model, and be able to interrogate each element when asked to do so. Candidates should discuss the merits of collaborative working and sharing ideas and information recognise that BIM plays a key role in reducing construction resource consumption and promoting sustainability. BIM software should be used, e.g. Autodesk Revit.

2.2 use tools and techniques to present my building project in a 3D environment

Candidates should demonstrate their knowledge and ability to use tools and techniques to present their 3D projects.

Evidence: From assessor observations, presentation of 3D model/crit/team presentation in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will learn the tools and techniques in the 3D software environment through practical experience. The accumulated knowledge and skills should enable them to present their 3D projects. Level 1 candidates will need structured guidance in getting to this point. BIM software should be used, e.g. Autodesk Revit.

2.3 demonstrate the impact of natural and artificial light on my building project

Candidates will be able to demonstrate simple lighting effects to show how they need to be taken into account in their project design.

Evidence: From assessor observations, presentation of 3D model/crit/team presentation, shadow study in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will action, analyse and demonstrate understanding of a shadow study. They should evaluate an artificial lighting schedule concluding in the selection and justification of the most energy efficient solution. BIM software should be used, e.g. Autodesk Revit.

2.4 communicate detailed information about a building to a client and project team using BIM technology

The candidate should be able to use the BIM environment confidently to communicate details of their project.

Evidence: From assessor observations, presentation of 3D model/crit/team presentation in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should be comfortable and confident in navigating and explaining fundamental principles as they work their way around their eco classroom project. They should include items in the checklist featured in the design brief, and discuss issues and successes. At level 1 templates and structures can be provided to help organise the presentation of work. BIM software should be used, e.g. Autodesk Revit.

UNIT 4: Planning, costing and presenting a sustainable building project. 3 credits (20 GLH) – D/615/8830

1. The candidate will understand issues associated with planning legislation and controls.

I can:

1.1 identify the importance of planning and planning protocols

Candidates can identify the reasons for planning and the role of the planning officer in enforcing planning protocols.

Evidence: Verbal/written reports in portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: At level 1 identifying key reasons and aspects of the planning officer role is sufficient but candidates should be encouraged to describe and explain these in as much detail as they are able. This will help develop literacy and communication skills.

1.2 identify planning requirements related to the design and construction of an Eco Classroom

Candidates should possess a sound knowledge of their eco classroom’s immediate location and local surrounding area insofar as they could be relevant to planning restrictions.

Evidence: From portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: They should demonstrate that they have investigated any planning restrictions on their construction project and taken all measures to ensure a positive result.

1.3 identify common problems that arise in planning applications

Candidates will have an understanding of the issues and constraints surrounding planning applications.

Evidence: From portfolios and/or internal controlled tests.

Additional information and guidance: They should be aware of a number of factors that influence a planning decision, particularly where construction will impact the local community and the environment, for example overdevelopment, conservation areas or areas of outstanding natural beauty, wildlife habitat or floodplain. They should have a general awareness regarding contaminated land restrictions and tree preservation.

1.4 take a lead in debating a contentious issue

Candidates should demonstrate leadership skills in the planning committee room.

Evidence: From assessor observations, portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: They should have prepared and rehearsed a 3 minute statement to counteract an argument and addition to presenting evidence, they should find reliable solutions to potential issues. Getting the tone of the debate right is critical – being sarcastic or angry puts listeners off immediately. A candidate who is ‘pro’ development should tell the ‘story’ of the eco classroom – why it is deemed necessary, for the greater good and the good of the local community. They should include significant facts, avoiding rhetoric, argument or comments that may offend the opposing party. In addition to presenting evidence, they should find reliable solutions to potential issues. Conversely, if the candidate opposes the eco classroom, he/she must return the same justification, clearly explaining why the project should not go ahead. Level 1 candidates will need structured guidance in preparing their piece.

1.5 agree appropriate measures to conclude a successful planning application

Candidates should be prepared to present supporting evidence at a planning committee meeting.

Evidence: Assessor observation and portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: They should have with them all site plans and design drawings (elevations, floor plans, sections) on title blocks if possible. Further information is available on the UK website http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/ Level 1 candidates will need support in organising their resources in keeping with the overall level 1 descriptor.

2. The candidate will understand issues associated with procurement for a construction project.

I can:

2.1 identify the effects of local and global procurement on local and global communities

Candidates should demonstrate they understand some key impacts of ethical and sustainable procurement both locally, internationally and globally.

Evidence: Portfolios and/or internal controlled tests.

Additional information and guidance: They will investigate 5 shopping items on a shopping receipt (e.g. the local supermarket) and determine where the goods are coming from (the source), how they are manufactured/grown, by whom, and how do they get to us. The candidate will understand that there is often a fine economic, environmental and social balance between supporting a local economy in one country and not doing so in the very neighbourhood in which they live. Working closely with local suppliers can generate employment, skills and training opportunities, and we can enable small and diverse businesses to share in the delivery of large contracts. And yet, not procuring goods from third world countries that rely on our business can prove disastrous. Procuring solar panels from Eastern Europe may well make our energy cheaper, but in the long run, have we really saved the planet when the lorry that has made its way across the continent has burned a colossal amount of fossil fuels to get them here? UK government’s Sustainable Procurement.

National Action Plan includes initiatives to

  • reduce waste, carbon emissions, energy and water consumption
  • protect biodiversity
  • stop the buying of timber from unsustainable sources
  • support fair and sustainable economic growth
  • deliver social benefits through procurement

Another excellent resource regarding industry and sustainable procurement can be found at http://www.ciria.org/service/
Web_Site/AM/ContentManagerNet/ContentDisplay.aspx?Section=Web_Site&ContentID=19278

2.2 identify properties of sustainable building materials

Candidates should demonstrate their knowledge of sustainable building materials through identifying information in their previous research.

Evidence: Portfolios and/or internal controlled tests.

Additional information and guidance: Level 1 candidates should be encouraged to go beyond simple identification where possible. This will help support progression to level 2.

2.3 select sustainable goods and services from local sources where practicable

Candidates should demonstrate knowledge of supplier/source and propose alternatives where impractical.

Evidence: Portfolios and/or internal controlled tests.

Additional information and guidance: They will write a letter to a local construction company seeking advice regarding the sustainability of their choice of materials and how they might be procured. They will make enquiries to investigate the availability of a local workforce, the level of skills required and the organisation’s capacity to build their particular eco classroom design.

2.4 produce a bill of quantities for a construction project

Candidates should demonstrate their ability to compile a schedule of materials using Autodesk Revit software.

Evidence: Bill of quantities via 3D model schedule

Additional information and guidance: They will seek local help from a Quantity Surveyor where practicable.

3. The candidate will be able to make effective presentations.

 I can:

3.1 support a presentation with appropriate digital technologies

Candidates should support their presentation using appropriate digital tools.

Evidence: Presentation files or links from portfolio.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will choose an appropriate method to present their project. This will be in a professional way, as though presenting to a professional audience. Encourage experimentation beyond bullet lists in Powerpoint. The best presentations are simple illustrative visuals with very little text. The text is what you say and can be provided separately. Feeling that it is necessary to read a lot of text can actually be a distraction to the audience as can a lot of unnecessary animation effects. Sound effects are almost always annoying! Link to web resources such as online videos to illustrate points. Level 1 candidates will need structured guidance but many adults do stereotypical boring presentations with Powerpoint simply because very few have had any real background or training in using the tool effectively. Also consider the number of powerpoint files that are distributed by e-mail and are simply cluttering folders. Consider that a URL to an on-line resource reaches anyone with the URL without the need to copy a file and if the originator of the file updates it everyone automatically gets the update. File based presentations are really a legacy of the past and we need to prepare children for the future so look into web based presentation tools. Mostly these are free.

3.2 design supporting media content to have impact and clarity

Candidates will design and present appropriate content to demonstrate impact and clarity.

Evidence: From portfolios.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates should prepare supporting content that can be used in their presentation. This can be eg video linked from a site such as You Tube or embedded in the presentation. Video editing tools good enough for this purpose are free so encourage their use as it then opens them up for students to use at home. Check copyright on images. Mediawiki is a good source of free illustrative content that is free for re-use. OpenClipart.org is a free source of images and drawings. Encourage production of their own illustrative drawings and diagrams. Inkscape is a good free resource for this www.inkscape.org

3.3 structure a presentation to prioritise the messages

Candidates should appreciate the basic principles of structuring a presentation to reinforce a limited number of key messages.

Evidence: Portfolios of evidence.

Additional information and guidance: Candidates will appreciate the importance of prioritising information. They should write a simple, logical outline regarding the key points, and introduce previous sketches and other appropriate visual aids if it helps get the message across. Level 1 candidates will need support in organising the structure of their presentation but should be encouraged to become increasingly self-sufficient in order to progress to Level 2.

3.4 make effective use of the time available while making a presentation

Assessors should check that the candidate has got the intended message across within the allocated time.

Evidence: From assessor observations.

Additional information and guidance: The candidate should aim to finish within an allotted time: and should also be concise. The presentation should include welcoming the client, setting out the key points and bringing about a purposeful conclusion.

3.5 identify strengths and weaknesses in my presentation

Candidates should be able to list strengths and weaknesses in their presentation.

Evidence: Portfolio

Additional information and guidance: This is a good opportunity for peer review. Candidates should be open to constructive criticism as well as recognition for their good points. Candidates should realise that improvements come from understanding weaknesses and working on them to turn them into strengths.

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